What Makes an Oktoberfest Beer? Munich Beer, Märzen & Festbier

What makes an Oktoberfest beer, an Oktoberfest beer?

Many people are quick to claim that the Oktoberfest beers are Märzens – a style traditionally brewed in March to be consumed after the harvest is over. But is all Oktoberfest beer really Märzen? And if not, how is it different?

It is somewhat true that the style of the beers produced for the Oktoberfest could be considered Märzen, but in reality, the beers featured as Oktoberfest beers fall into a wider category. Also, the BJCP (more about them later) now recognize a difference between Märzen and ‘Festbier’, although they are not an official authority on the matter.

The BJCP (Beer Judge Certification Program) seek to explicitly categorise most widely known beer styles and give detailed descriptions as to their aspects so that any individual beer can be judged in a standard way by any judge as an example of whatever style it purports to be (primarily for competitions) based on the guidelines provided.

The BJCP current guidelines (2015) distinguishes Märzen and other similar styles from ‘Festbier’ (the style set aside to describe odes to Oktoberfest beer) as follows:

Less intense and less richly toasted than a Märzen. More rich-heavy in body than a Helles, with more hop flavor and higher alcohol. Less rich in malt intensity than a Maibock. The malt complexity is similar to a higher-gravity Czech Premium Pale Lager, although without the associated hops.

As stated though, they are not an official authority on what any beer actually is, they just provide useful guidelines so that their judges have something to work from. Often though, they are as close as you can currently get to an objective style guideline. You can find the excerpt from the style guidelines for festbier here or their most up to date full guidelines (2015 at the time of writing) here.

Mainly though, it’s one thing to match the style of the Oktoberfest beers but to actually feature as an Oktoberfest beer proper, you need to be an experienced Munich brewery who adheres strictly to the Rheinheitsgebot (Bavarian purity law). In practice, at least for now, you have to be one of the following breweries:

  • Augustiner
  • Hacker-Pschorr
  • Hofbräu
  • Löwenbräu
  • Paulaner
  • Spaten

Wikipedia provides the following information at this page:

Oktoberfestbier is a registered trademark of the big six Munich breweries, who call themselves the Club of Munich Brewers. Oktoberfestbier is also known as Munich Beer, and – along with Bavarian beer – Munich beer is protected by the European Union as a Protected Geographical Indication (PGI). [18]

So even a beer that tastes exactly like an Oktoberfestbier won’t actually be one unless it is brewed by one the 6 breweries above. The BJCP circumvent this issue, as mentioned above, by naming the relevant category ‘festbier’ so as to indicate that we are talking about allusions to the Oktoberfest style, but we can’t rightly call them Oktoberfest beers.

What’s important to note, which makes the Oktoberfest beers unique as a style, is that each year, a new selection will be brewed by each individual brewery. The Oktoberfest is, in a way, a bit of a competition between the aforementioned 6 breweries and so each brewery’s beer can be quite different from the same brewery’s beer the last year as they switch things up to keep people interested.

So if you were hoping to produce a beer for Oktoberfest, your only feasible option is really to work for one of the 6 breweries. Hypothetically, with astronomical investment, one could set up a brewery in Munich and start making beer on massive scales and hope that it gets loved by the World and Germany so much so that it is recognised as worthy as an Oktoberfest beer before you die, but you would have to try very hard (or wait a very long time) in order to offset the fact that you do not share the history…

If it’s the right time of year, and if you’re quick enough, you’ll find Oktoberfest beer to buy here.

Oktoberfest: Everything you Need to Know about the Munich Beer Festival

Want to know everything you absolutely need to know about the German beer festival known throughout the world as Oktoberfest? Here we give a complete guide telling you everything you need to know about the Wiesn!

What is Oktoberfest?

Oktoberfest is the world’s largest annual festival with over 6 million people visiting Munich from all over the globe to join in the celebrations by drinking specially brewed German lager, dancing, enjoying the funfair and generally having a great time! Specifically, the festival is a Volksfest which means “people’s festival”. Such events always combine either a beer festival (as is the case for Oktoberfest) or wine festival with a travelling funfair! The funfair, as you might expect, will feature rides, games, and various vendors of snacks including traditional German sausages, pretzels (or bretzels in German) and sweets.
The beer for the Oktoberfest is brewed especially for the occasion and varies from year to year as the breweries compete with each other, in a sense, to win the hearts of their drinkers. It is often brewed in a style very similar to ‘Märzen’ – traditionally brewed in March and then put away for consumption at the end of the harvest season.

When is Oktoberfest? – Oktoberfest Dates

The Oktoberfest always begins (except in extremely rare circumstances like war or cholera epidemics!) on the third Saturday of September and runs for at least 16 days. If that day is October 3rd, the festival ends, otherwise it continues until October 3rd comes round – this is German Unity Day. Here’s a list of some recent and upcoming Oktoberfest dates:

2015: September 19th – October 4th
2016: September 17th – October 3rd
2017: September 16th – October 3rd
2018: September 22nd – October 7th

Most of the tents open each day between around 9am and 10am and close by 11.30pm or midnight.

Note: We are running an Oktoberfest UK event in Bristol this year called Oktoberfest for the People! come along and help us to celebrate this traditional annual celebration with authentic German Beer!

The Name & Spelling of Oktoberfest or Die Wiesn

The name Oktoberfest is actually quite an interesting word in that it remains the same in pretty much all languages! Only non-Western-latin alphabet languages have an alternative translation (except the Münchners – the people of Munich, themselves). Saying this though, it is often spelled alternatively or wrongly: with English speakers often unsure whether it’s Octoberfest, October Fest, or Oktober Fest instead! The problem is that Oktoberfest as a word only translates directly into the Munich Beer Festival – Oktoberfest!
To attempt a translation where Oktober is translated or treated separately, does away with the true Munich Beer Festival association. This is because it is only in a historical sense that it is so heavily October-related. Nowadays, the German beer festival falls much more into September, so the spelling Octoberfest is really used only to appeal to an English-speaking audience who will perhaps be less alienated by this spelling, or by mistake!

The people of Munich (or Münchners) do have their own colloquial word for the Oktoberfest though: Die Wiesn. This name is abbreviated from the name for the grounds Theresienwiese (“Theresa’s Fields”) upon which the Oktoberfest is held, named after Princess Therese of Saxony-Hildburghausen.

The History of Oktoberfest

The reason the grounds takes her name dates back to exactly the first year of the famous volksfest when Crown Prince Ludwig, later to become King Ludwig I, married her on 12 October 1810. The Royal Wedding celebration took place in the very same location as the Oktoberfest happens today! Back then though, horse races were the sole entertainment. All citizens of Munich were invited to attend and it was decided to continue the celebrations each year to follow. The grounds were renamed Theresienweise in the princesses’ honour. She became queen 15 years later.

The following year, the horse races featured an agricultural show, intended to boost Bavarian agriculture. This agricultural show still occurs every 3 years in the southern part of the festival grounds. The horse races, though, are no longer held.

As the years went by, the festival grew and changed, introducing swings, carousels and beer stands. The festival was pushed back a bit, which is why it now mostly falls in September, so that the visitors could expect warmer weather enjoy the gardens. In 1896, the beer stands were replaced by tents and the rides on offer had developed into a large funfair thanks to the rapid growth of the fairground trade from the 1870’s. The tents and beer halls were set up by the enterprising landlords, supported by the individual breweries. Bavarian lager had very recently become extremely trendy because before the 1860’s, beer was never so clean and fine as breweries hadn’t had the ability to reliably refrigerate.

Oktoberfest girl in Durndl with Munich beer. Hacker-Pschorr

Munich Beer

Beer which is brewed for the Oktoberfest is called Oktoberfest Bier or Munich Beer. It all hails from Bavaria, a large region of Germany, in the South-East, encompassing Munich.

The history of lager is a story for another day but suffice it to say that it was very popular by the late 1890’s and so the big Bavarian breweries of the time were drafted in to produce large quantities of this type of beer for the burgeoning Oktoberfest celebrations. It is these same 6 breweries who still produce all of the official Oktoberfest beers – Paulaner, Spaten, Löwenbräu, Hofbräu, Hacker-Pschorr and Augustiner. Find out more about these Bavarian breweries at our Bavarian beer page. 

The terms Munich beer and Oktoberfest beer are protected as an appellation and can technically only be used by those breweries for that particular type of beer. See: What Makes an Oktoberfest Beer?

Oktoberfest Tickets

Did you know that the Oktoberfest is actually free?! You don’t need tickets to enter – you just need to get yourself there! The funfair operators, stands, and vendors as well as the beer tents are all owned by individual people or businesses – there is no central body to pay.

But Make Reservations!

However, the beer tents get very, very crowded! By law, there are days and times when the tents operate on a first come, first served basis. If you’re not at the Oktoberfest by about 2.30pm on these days you very possibly won’t even manage to get into a tent at all! The rest of the time, most tents run a reservation schedule. You will need to contact the tents directly in order to make these reservations. The reservations are usually specific to a table, this way seasoned Oktoberfest-goers can reserve the same table each year, which, because of the way the waitressing system works, they will most likely get the same waitress!

Oh, but a table reservation in any of the tents will typically cost between €24 to €38 (£20 – £33 or $27 – $43). Once you’ve got your table though, you’ve often got it for the entire rest of the day, so many consider it well worth it! Think ahead though, many of the tents’ reservation slots are all booked out by February to March!

How do you reserve a table at the Oktoberfest?

If you visit the Beer Tents page at oktoberfest.de you’ll be able to explore all of the different beer tents at the festival and find the phone numbers, email addresses and other contact information. The tent pages also give you up to date information about the capacity of the tents, their hosting brewery, and information about the entertainment they provide.

Closer to Home

There are often Oktoberfest celebrations going on in many other countries around the same time as Oktoberfest. In fact, we at Bierhaus are organising an Oktoberfest event in Bristol, UK this year (2016). Just like the real Oktoberfest in Munich, our homage to the Munich beer festival will be free to all!

And there we have it!

Hopefully this guide helped you to understand some of the most important things to grasp about this famous German beer festival!

Pils, Pilsner, or Pilsener? The Confusing Etymology of this Lager Beer

How do you spell Pilsner, Pils… Pilsener… what?

It’s confusing. Pick up a lager beer [not larger beer, while we’re talking about spelling!] and you might be greeted with a claim that it is either a Pilsner or a Pilsener! In some cases, such a beer might even claim to be simply a ‘Pils’.

So what, then? If it’s a Pilsener, is it different from a Pilsner? Is a Pils different yet again?

Well, no. Not really. In fact, there is no official distinction between any of these terms.

But which should you use for this type of [German?] lager beer?

In order to answer this and find the proper spelling of Pilsner, Pilsener or whatever it is, we need to trace the style back to its roots, which perhaps surprisingly, lie in what is now the region of Bohemia in the Czech Republic: a town called Pilsen, or Plzeň in Czech. Pilsner was created in 1842, when Bohemia belonged to the German-speaking Austro-Hungarian empire. Although the maiden brew was named Plzeňský Prazdroj – “Pilsen’s Original Source” or “the Fountainhead at Pilsen” in Czech, the German name was the title which, somewhat ironically, overruled it – Pilsner Urquell

Although that political enforcement of a foreign name onto what was initially a Czech invention might seem awkward, fast-forward to today, the brewery Plzeňský prazdroj a.s. or ‘Pilsner Urquell Brewery (owned now by SABMiller) are actually very happy to be known by this name, even holding a two-day beer festival called ‘Pilsner Fest‘ every year.

So in a sense, this form of describing this particular type of lager beer is confirmed to be Pilsner from the horse’s mouth, as it were.

So why does anyone use a different form or spelling of Pilsener / Pilsner?

Well, it turns out that (based on Google search data) Germans actually prefer the spelling Pilsener. Only recently (that is, since about a year ago) has the search volume for ‘Pilsener’ decidedly taken a dive in favour of rising Pils.
The US and UK, on the other hand have always been fairly anti-Pilsener it would seem, in favour of Plzeňský prazdroj a.s.’s ‘Pilsner’ and rising (along with a much subtler rise in the use of ‘Pils’).

Although there is no definitively correct answer, Pilsner is by far the most popular spelling for this lager beer style in the major English-speaking countries and it looks like the shortened form Pils is catching up. So if you need to write it, your best bet would be to use Pilsner for now, or even just Pils but expect to see some traditional breweries like Jever still using the to-be-antiquated Pilsener for a while yet!

It’s worth noting by the way, that some beers claiming to be Pils, Pilsners, or Pilseners are arguably none of the above, being brewed with cheap alternatives to proper malt, resulting in relatively tasteless, watery beer. Authentic Bavaria beer would never be brewed this way, if not initially due to avoiding embarrassment, then because of the Reinheitsgebot.

Check out the German Beer Institute for even more information about the history of Pilsner!

Jever vs Schultheiss - Pilsner Beer Comparison

German Pilsner Beer side-by-side Comparison – Jever vs Schultheiss | Bierhaus Blog

Exploring Two Great Examples of German Pilsner Beer

Today, we will be comparing two big names in the world of German Pilsener – Jever and Schultheiss. Unlike in our previous comparison between two huge Bavarian hell beers which differ by very nuanced attributes, these two famous German lagers are almost worlds apart within their style – German Pilsner beer.

A Quick History of These Two German Pilseners

Although these two beers both label themselves ‘Pilsener’ so that, having no prior knowledge or expectations, anyone might expect them to be very similar beers, their history and location make them very different beasts. One thing these far-flung examples of German pilsner beer do share, though, is that their original breweries were founded only a few years apart from each other. Friesisches Brauhaus zu Jever was founded in 1848 and the Berliner-Schultheiss brewery arriving slightly earlier in 1842.

The first twist in the tale, though, is that the Berliner-Schultheiss brewery was merged with the Berliner Kindl brewery in January 2006, creating a new entity – the Berliner-Kindl-Schultheiss brewery – one of the largest breweries in the Berlin area. Jever, on the other hand, is still brewed in the same brewery (although belonging to Dortmunder Brau & Brunnen) which is very important since its most well known claim to fame is the softness of its water, something the town of Jever, after which the Pils is named, and where it’s brewed, is famous for. Soft water is said to be extremely important in the brewing of Pilsner beer, since it carries the noble hop flavours, whilst harder water tends to accentuate malty or fruity notes which are much better suited to English ales, like bitters.

Impressions

Both appear very similar, although the Jever tends to form its head more densely than the Schultheiss, possibly due to a difference in water quality. Side by side, the Jever looks like it could be very slightly paler, having a more yellow hue than its rival’s very light, gold tinge but the difference is negligible.
The difference in the aroma however, is pronounced. While the Jever showcases a clean, fresh, herbaceous character, lending to its brewery’s namesake, the Schultheiss displays a slightly less captivating but rounded, more earthy, ‘harder’, malt-backed aroma.

The differences in the flavour are even more obvious, with the Schultheiss lending a certain sweetness, giving an impression of a subtle thickness compared to the drier, more ephemeral, yet somewhat more bitter, Jever.

The Jever does, indeed, have an airy, herbaceous feel which would seem too weak without the pronounced and lasting bitterness to back it up, whilst the Schultheiss is more of an all-rounder, offering a little sweetness, a bit of malt, subtle biscuit and even woody hints. The texture / mouthfeel is identical as far as I can tell. Subtle differences in water hardness may not be detectable this way though, but only in how the hop flavours carry over, an area in which the Jever does win over the Schultheiss.

Conclusion

The Jever is, for sure, the cleanest of these two long-lived German Pilsner beers. Saying this, the Schultheiss is ‘fuller’ being more of a people pleaser, offering bits from the whole spectrum at the expense of a properly distinctive character. Jever takes risks: omitting certain potential characteristics from its complexion in favour of a very certain personality which will either impress no end, or jar. Fortunately, my palate enjoys the fresh, clean flavours that Jever displays, overpowering the lack of a ‘middle’ aspect but I am a big fan, too, of Schultheiss and its more earthy, comforting character which has its own place to live peacefully beside Jever.

Tegernseer Hell versus Augustiner Hell - Helles comparison of German Lager Beers

Bavarian Helles side-by-side Comparison – Augustiner Lagerbier Hell vs. Tegernseer Hell

Today, we compare two infamous Hell beers side by side! Modern traditional German beer styles are notorious for being clean, crisp and often quite light so it can be refreshing to really pick apart the differences between two high quality German beers of the same style designation and appreciate the nuances.

What’s a Hell (bier)?

Helles (pronounced ‘Hell-ez’ [more or less]) is used in Germany as a noun for ‘a light one’ whilst hell is an adjective for ‘light. So Hell beers are, indeed, light but this is not to undermine their character which is all about satisfying the palate with unique personality despite the lack of of significant hop aroma or up-front bitterness. In fact, up until the end of the 20th Century, Helles was the staple beer of Bavaria and even more popular in Germany than today and only recently has been overtaken by Pilsners in Germany in general and Wheat Beer in Bavaria.

Our Contenders

Both hailing from Bavaria, Tegernseer Hell and Augustinerbräu München’s ‘Lagerbier Hell’ are frequently cited as prime examples of The Reinheitsgebot or Bavarian Purity Law at it’s best. As ‘vollbiers’, meaning ‘full beer’, you might expect that they share some special property with other specific German beers labelled ‘vollbier’ but actually, this used to be used as a fairly wide tax category. Now, the meaning of ‘vollbier’ has been somewhat lost but Helles styles have strongly retained the association.

Impressions

While in colour, both beer look almost indeterminately identical, the Augustiner seems to have a more fluffy, whiter, persistent head. But although appearance is important, the real test of any beer lies in the aroma, the flavour and mouthfeel.

The most distinctive difference is a crisp, clean sweetness emanating from the Tegernseer whilst the Augustiner has a slightly more musty, grainlike ‘bitter’ aroma. The Augustiner comes across on the whole as slightly more complex in the nose even hinting at subtle woody notes while the Tegernseer speaks more of light toasted caramel.

The Tegernseer hits the tongue with an ever so light, bready sweetness and medium-light bitterness giving a clean but rounded overall impression. The Augustiner is notably drier, focusing more it seems, on that really crisp effect with a tiny hint of light biscuit.

Going back to the Tegernseer, it has a much smoother mouthfeel, helped on by the slightly higher sweetness, even producing a pleasant ‘sticky’ sense whilst still feeling light and airy. The Augustiner is somewhat more serious with its matter-of-fact crisp dryness which, August aside, feels conceptually more like early October, compared to the balmy late April feel of the Tegernseer.

Conclusion

Both of these traditional Bavarian beers are exceptional and in either case, the quality and careful execution of the brewing is clearly apparent. Whilst they are rather similar, both being Helles of Bavaria, their nuanced differences, which is really what can make or break a lager, are apparent. While the Augustiner Helles has an ever so slightly ‘rougher’ grain-like flavour and crisper dryness, the Tegernseer impresses with its marginally sweeter softness and more caramelesque flavour.

No doubt a pair well enjoyed in one sitting where refreshing, crisp, and authentic lager is what you’re looking for but want to avoid drinking the same beer so as not to lose any appreciation! What’s for sure is that either will impress you much more than Carling, Carlsberg or Fosters, for example, since although nuanced, the high quality character is obvious so will last a lot longer and give much more enjoyment than any watery substitute!

 

If you’re interested to buy German beer in the UK such as these classic german beer brands then you can visit bierhaus-online.co.uk to get German beer delivered by us to your home or business!

Bierhaus the home of German Beer and lager, in Morpeth

Bierhaus the home of German Beer and lager, in Morpeth

If you are looking for authentically brewed German beer in the Morpeth or the Northumberland area then Bierhaus can beat all expectations. Many brands of German Beer are on offer from Bierhaus in Northumberland and Morpeth including; Alpenwald, Astra Urtyp lager, Augustiner Edelstoff, Ayinger Celebrator, Brinkhoffs No1, Dom Kolsch, Franziskaner Dunkel wheat Beer, Fraziskaner Hefe wheat beer, Fruh Kolsch, Gaffel Kolsch, and Peters Kolsch, to name a few.

Our Delicious and refreshing German Beer is delivered to your door in the Northumberland area and to customers living in Morpeth and the nearby towns of Alnwick, Amble, Ashington, Bamburgh, Bardon Mill, Belford, Berwick-upon-Tweed, Brandon, Chesters, Chollerford, Corbridge, Craster, Dalton, Elsdon, Embleton, Ellington, Falstone, Gateshead, Greenhaugh, Greenhead, Haltwhistle, Hartley, Haydon Bridge, Hexham, Highfields, Housesteads, Ingram, Langley, Linton, Longhorsley, Lowick, Lynemouth,Mindrum, Morpeth, Murton, Netherton, Newcastle upon Tyne, Once Brewed, Rochester, Rothbury, Seahouses, Shipley, Stonehaugh, Vindolanda, Warkworth and Wooler.

Bierhaus German beer, lager, cocktails, and wines will make a compliment to any social occasion or event.  Bierhaus is now offering five out of the original six ‘Oktoberfest’ beers in bottles and four of the six kegs sourced from carefully selected, highly distinguished Munich brewers. These breweries include Paulaner, Spaten, Löwenbräu, Hofbräu, Hacker Pschorr and Augustiner.

These beers are specially brewed for the largest Volksfest, with more than six million people attending each year. Renowned for their fine flavours, the brewers compete to become the finest each October.

Bierhaus authentic high quality German lagers and beers are on offer in Morpeth and also in other towns close to Northumberland. Please feel free to look around our online store at all the quality imported, authentic German beer and lager that Bierhaus have on offer.

Bierhaus the home of German Beer and lager, in Gateshead

Bierhaus the home of German Beer and lager, in Gateshead

If you are looking for authentically brewed German beer in the Gateshead or the Tyne and Wear area then Bierhaus can beat all expectations. Many brands of German Beer are on offer from Bierhaus in Tyne and Wear and Gateshead including; Alpenwald, Astra Urtyp lager, Augustiner Edelstoff, Ayinger Celebrator, Brinkhoffs No1, Dom Kolsch, Franziskaner Dunkel wheat Beer, Fraziskaner Hefe wheat beer, Fruh Kolsch, Gaffel Kolsch, and Peters Kolsch, to name a few.

Our Delicious and refreshing German Beer is delivered to your door in the Tyne and Wear area and to customers living in Gateshead and the nearby towns of Blaydon, Rowlands Gill, Ryton, Whickham, Newcastle, Benwell, Byker, Dudley, Gosforth, Newcastle upon Tyne, Throckley, Walker, Backworth, Cullercoats, Dinnington, Earsdon, Kenton, Killingworth, Longbenton, Monkseaton, North Shields, Shiremoor, Tynemouth, Wallsend, Whitley Bay, Boldon, Cleadon, Hebburn, Jarrow, Marsden, South Shields, Whitburn, Whitburn Colliery, Hetton-le-Hole, Houghton-le-Spring, Rhyhope, Sunderland and Washington.

Bierhaus German beer, lager, cocktails, and wines will make a compliment to any social occasion or event.  Bierhaus is now offering five out of the original six ‘Oktoberfest’ beers in bottles and four of the six kegs sourced from carefully selected, highly distinguished Munich brewers. These breweries include Paulaner, Spaten, Löwenbräu, Hofbräu, Hacker Pschorr and Augustiner.

These beers are specially brewed for the largest Volksfest, with more than six million people attending each year. Renowned for their fine flavours, the brewers compete to become the finest each October.

Bierhaus authentic high quality German lagers and beers are on offer in Gateshead and also in other towns close to Tyne and Wear. Please feel free to look around our online store at all the quality imported, authentic German beer and lager that Bierhaus have on offer.

Bierhaus the home of German Beer and lager, in Durham

Bierhaus the home of German Beer and lager, in Durham

If you are looking for authentically brewed German beer in the Durham or the Country Durham area then Bierhaus can beat all expectations. Many brands of German Beer are on offer from Bierhaus in Country Durham and Durham including; Alpenwald, Astra Urtyp lager, Augustiner Edelstoff, Ayinger Celebrator, Brinkhoffs No1, Dom Kolsch, Franziskaner Dunkel wheat Beer, Fraziskaner Hefe wheat beer, Fruh Kolsch, Gaffel Kolsch, and Peters Kolsch, to name a few.

Our Delicious and refreshing German Beer is delivered to your door in the Country Durham area and to customers living in Durham and the nearby towns of Anfield Plain, Barnard Castle, Billingham, Bishope, Catchgate, Chester-le-Street, Consett, Craghead, Darlington, Durham, Eaglescliffe, Easington, Everington, Ferryhill, Gainford, Hartlepool, Lanchester, Newton Aycliffe, Perterlee, Sacriston, Seaham, Sedgefield, Shotley Bridge, Spennymoor, Stanley, Stockton-in-Tees, Tanfield and Willington.

Bierhaus German beer, lager, cocktails, and wines will make a compliment to any social occasion or event.  Bierhaus is now offering five out of the original six ‘Oktoberfest’ beers in bottles and four of the six kegs sourced from carefully selected, highly distinguished Munich brewers. These breweries include Paulaner, Spaten, Löwenbräu, Hofbräu, Hacker Pschorr and Augustiner.

These beers are specially brewed for the largest Volksfest, with more than six million people attending each year. Renowned for their fine flavours, the brewers compete to become the finest each October.

Bierhaus authentic high quality German lagers and beers are on offer in Durham and also in other towns close to Country Durham. Please feel free to look around our online store at all the quality imported, authentic German beer and lager that Bierhaus have on offer.

Bierhaus the home of German Beer and lager, in Carlisle

Bierhaus the home of German Beer and lager, in Carlisle

If you are looking for authentically brewed German beer in the Carlisle or the Cumbria area then Bierhaus can beat all expectations. Many brands of German Beer are on offer from Bierhaus in Cumbria and Carlisle including; Alpenwald, Astra Urtyp lager, Augustiner Edelstoff, Ayinger Celebrator, Brinkhoffs No1, Dom Kolsch, Franziskaner Dunkel wheat Beer, Fraziskaner Hefe wheat beer, Fruh Kolsch, Gaffel Kolsch, and Peters Kolsch, to name a few.

Our Delicious and refreshing German Beer is delivered to your door in the Cumbria area and to customers living in Calisle and the nearby towns of Alston, Ambleside, Appleby-in-Westmorland, Arnside, Aspatria, Barrow-in-Furness, Bowness-on-Windermere, Brampton, Brough, Burton-in-Kendal, Carlisle, Cockermouth, Dalton-in-Furness, Glenridding, Grange-over-Sands, Grasmere, Heversham, Kendal, Keswick, Kirkby Lonsdale, Kirkby Stephen, Maryport, Millom, Milnthorpe, Muncaster, Oulton, Patterdale, Penrith, Ravenglass, Rheged, Sedbergh, Sellafield, Shap, Silloth, Swarthmoor, Temple Sowerby, Thornhill,  Ulverston, Upton, Walton, Wetheral, Whitehaven, Windermere and Workington.

Bierhaus German beer, lager, cocktails, and wines will make a compliment to any social occasion or event.  Bierhaus is now offering five out of the original six ‘Oktoberfest’ beers in bottles and four of the six kegs sourced from carefully selected, highly distinguished Munich brewers. These breweries include Paulaner, Spaten, Löwenbräu, Hofbräu, Hacker Pschorr and Augustiner.

These beers are specially brewed for the largest Volksfest, with more than six million people attending each year. Renowned for their fine flavours, the brewers compete to become the finest each October.

Bierhaus authentic high quality German lagers and beers are on offer in Carlisle and also in other towns close to Cumbria . Please feel free to look around our online store at all the quality imported, authentic German beer and lager that Bierhaus have on offer.